Tag Archives: symbols

Symbols #53: Raven

The narrative poem “The Raven” by Edgar Allen Poe is one of the most notorious examples of the use of this mysterious and macabre bird, which is often associated with its cousin, the crow.

As an animal that feeds on dead bodies, the raven has cemented itself as a sign of death and doom in the human psyche. The symbolism of ravens is so common that modern audiences identify it with a bad omen.

Visual communicators of all types can use the symbol to foreshadow death and disaster or create an atmosphere of doom and gloom.

Symbols #52: Fire

As a crucial element in the development of civilization in the history of mankind, fire is widely seen as a symbol with multiple meanings: a flame can signify wisdom and knowledge, while a raging fire is often used to symbolize fear, pain, anger, punishment, destruction and even death. Such associations likely hearken back to earliest days of mankind.

After all, before humans found ways to properly harness this element, fire was a force that quickly could demolish early settlements. Therefore, fire commanded fear. Still today, drought-ridden regions are consumed by fires that can’t be adequately controlled. Even now, we witness the struggle in the Western United States.

On the other hand, fire can also represent rebirth and renewal, as in the example of the phoenix, a mythical bird that ignites itself and emerges from its own ashes. It can also symbolize passion combusting from within.

Dream #2: Dream Interpretation

Dreams are like enchanted doorways to the mind, revealing our deepest needs, desires, feelings, and fears.

In the most whimsical, bizarre and sometimes terrifying ways, our dreams present to us symbols, metaphors and allegories that are rich in personal meaning and significance.

Our dreams can teach us a lot about ourselves, there is no denying that. And while they are extremely invaluable tools of self-discovery, the art of “dream interpretation” has been greatly muddied, monetized and complicated to unnecessary extents.

Have you ever had a dream that you were curious to discover the meaning of, but felt the need to consult some kind of “A-Z dream dictionary,” online dream meaning website, or even “dream consultant” such as a psychic or intuitive? If you are like most people, you will feel as though this is a natural and necessary step in order for you to understand the meaning of your dreams. But it isn’t.

I’ve bought dream dictionaries and have consulted with all types of people in the past, trying to desperately understand the meaning of dreams which I felt had great significance to me. But eventually, I realized that the entire confusing process was completely unnecessary.

Understanding the meaning of your dreams doesn’t need to be something cryptic or complex. It never needed to be in the first place. And tomorrow’s post you will discover why.

Source: https://lonerwolf.com/understand-the-meaning-of-your-dreams/

Symbols #50: The Rose

Associated with love and romance, after all, it is widely used in film, art and literature as representations of these concepts. And nothing says, “I love you,” like a gift of a single red rose. The connection is nothing new, either. Romans venerated the flower as the symbol of their love goddess, Venus, and Greeks associated the symbol with the goddess of love, Aphrodite.

Roses can also signify other things, depending on the context. To Catholics, the rose represents the Virgin Mary and the rosary.

Symbols #45: The Gayatri Yantra

The Illumined Mind and Universal Knowledge – This symbol represents the illumined mind and far-sighted wisdom. The words and sounds of the Gayatri Mantra comprise the most powerful of Vedic affirmations. using this symbol removes the possibility of making wrong choices in life by empowering all truth. It ocalizes complex and cosmic wisdom about all earth elements, plants, trees, animals, insects, fishes and birds, making an understanding of the whole life creation. Enhances the ability to sharpen one’s intellect and spiritual awareness. Used on water, it carries the harmonic resonance of the wisdom of all life. On a larger, universal scale, the use of the Gayatri Mantra and the sacred symbol, the Gayatri Yantra, representing those enlightened sounds, radiates vast and powerful knowledge to all beings.

Symbols #43: Tibetan Buddhism Auspicious Symbols

In Tibetan Buddhism, these symbols are said to be the luckiest and most sacred of all. Frequently seen in combination with one another, each represents a different component of Buddhist philosophy.

The Parasol: Representing protection and shelter, the Parasol shows how Buddha’s teachings will shield us from the “heat” of forces like greed and lust.

The Golden Fish: A symbol of joy and liberation, the Fish represent freedom from samsara, or the cycle of life, death, and rebirth.

The Conch Shell: Used to call individuals to prayer, the Conch’s resounding trumpet represents the influence of dharma and its ability to awaken us from ignorance.

The Lotus: A symbol of enlightenment, the Lotus mirrors human suffering. Growing through muck in order to blossom, the Lotus shows that we too may blossom through Buddha’s wisdom.

The Urn: A symbol of abundance, the Urn is evocative of Buddha’s spiritual wealth, demonstrating that there is no end to his knowledge and wisdom.

The Infinite Knot: With no beginning or end, the Infinite Knot reflects Buddha’s infinite compassion as well as the interconnectedness of all living things.

The Banner: Also known as the Flag, the Banner represents victory over ignorance and the obstacles that block the path to enlightenment.

The Wheel: The Wheel of Law, or Dharmachakra, is a summation of Buddha’s teachings. The eight spokes are Buddha’s Eightfold Path, while the inner hub is the discipline required to follow it.

Symbols #42: Om Mani Padme Hum

Om Mani Padme Hum is a mantra of benevolence and is often recited to inspire compassion. The syllable “Om” represents the body, spirit, and speech of Buddha; “Mani” is for the path of teaching; “Padme” for the wisdom of the path, and “Hum” indicates the union of wisdom and the path to it. Though commonly associated with Tibetan Buddhism, meditators across various practices find this mantra inspiring. Compassion, after all, isn’t exclusive to any one belief system.

Symbols #41: Mudras

Mudras are sacred hand gestures and expressions of inner wisdom. Each mudra represents a different action or form of energy. In meditation, mudras help maintain focus, allowing the meditator to channel a specific energy for their practice.

Mudras are also a common feature of Eastern art, as various figures and deities are often shown gesturing with a specific mudra. In fact, mudras are some of the most distinguishing characteristics, helping the viewer better understand the meaning behind a specific statue or image.

Vitarka Mudra

Thumb and forefinger touch to create a circle

A gesture of instruction, wisdom, and intellect, this mudra represents transmission of knowledge. The mudra’s circle also represents the perfection of dharma.

Abhaya Mudra

Right palm faces outward, fingers are straight

A gesture of protection, reassurance, and comfort, this mudra means “no fear.”

Bhumisparsha Mudra

The fingers of the right hand touch the ground

A gesture of determination and steadfastness, this mudra represents the strength necessary to overcome temptation.

Symbols #40: Happy Buddha

Full of exuberance, Happy Buddha is often mistaken for Siddhārtha Gautama, the founder of Buddhism. But the image of Happy Buddha is actually based on a wandering Chinese monk, Budai (Hotei, in Japanese), who lived centuries ago.

Happy Buddha is believed to be Maitreya, or the Buddha to come. His plump figure and benign countenance suggest magnanimity and plenitude. Also called Laughing Buddha, his signature smile is symbolic of pure joy. Happy Buddha is considered a symbol of good luck, and it is thought that rubbing his big head or belly brings fortune and wealth. At the same time, his walking stick and satchel remind us to pay attention to the journey before us, not just the destination.