Tag Archives: science

~Western Fertility~

In 2017, Swan, one of the world’s leading environmental and reproductive epidemiologists, co-authored a meta-analysis that came to a staggering conclusion: The sperm count of average Western countries had fallen by 59% between 1977 and 2011.

What do you think to this?

Some possible reasons:

~The elites want to destroy the West and bring in the New World Order.

~Pesticides & bad diets

~Stress

~Contraception

~Drinking water recycling containing contraceptive chemicals in the water men drink

~Soy products, estrogen production in men

~Depression, mental health etc.

Crystals #8: How Do Crystals Work?

“Science has proven that matter is 99.999999999999% empty space. And what makes up this empty space: energy. Energy is everything, and everything is energy. You, the chair you’re sitting on, the phone you’re holding, and the crystals you know and love – all of it is vibrating energy.

“Everything is energy and that’s all there is to it. This is not philosophy. This is physics.” ~ Albert Einstein

Just like everything else in the universe, we each have our own unique vibrational frequency. People with higher vibrations radiate kindness, love, peace, and compassion, whereas people with lower vibrations experience more low-vibe emotions like jealousy, anxiety, anger, or fear.

Whatever frequency you’re at, as a human, your vibration is very unstable and very easily influenced. It changes constantly as we’re exposed to other people, social media, the news, traffic, the weather, good news, bad news, our own memories, etc.

Crystals, on the other hand, have a super stable energy frequency that doesn’t change. Why? They’re made up of a fixed, regularly repeating, perfect geometric pattern of molecules. And they maintain their perfect stability with no effort. Exactly the opposite of our constantly changing, non-stable human nature.

So why does the stability of a crystal matter? Well, more stable energy = more powerful energy. And powerful energy can influence the energies around it. This is why crystals can so profoundly influence our unstable (less powerful) energy.”

Source: https://aetherbeautyco.com/blogs/goodvibesbeauty/crystals-the-science-the-spiritual

~Laika Believe~

Laika believe that the physical world nests within the realm of the mind, which rests within the domain of the soul, which is held within the folds of the spirit. Spirit is the wellspring from which everything else emerges: It is pure light.

As seers who perceive the invisible world of energy and spirit, the Laika understand that everything in the universe is made of light, and that it forms and creates matter. In some things, light is bound very tightly, as in trees and stones, while in others it’s more fluid, such as in rivers or in sunlight. Today, scientific discoveries confirm that when we look deeply into the heart of matter at the most fundamental level, all we find is vibration and light.

Source: The Four Winds Society Email Article

Philosophy #25: Scientism

Scientism refers to a belief in the universal applicability of the scientific method and approach, and the view that empirical science constitutes the most authoritative worldview or most valuable part of human learning to the exclusion of other viewpoints. Scientism describes the dogmatic endorsement of scientific methodology and the reduction of all knowledge to only that which is measurable.

Philosophy #24: Romanticism

Romanticism was an artistic revolt against aristocratic social and political norms of the Age of Enlightenment and a reaction against the scientific rationalization of nature. Romanticism placed new emphasis on such emotions as trepidation, horror, terror, and awe – especially that which is experienced in confronting the sublimity of untamed nature. Romanticism was rooted in the German Sturm und Drang movement, which prized intuition and emotion over Enlightenment rationalism.

Philosophy #21: Physicalism

Physicalism is a philosophical position holding that everything which exists is no more extensive than its physical properties; that is, that there are no kinds of things other than physical things. According to physicalism, the language of physics is the universal language of science and, consequently, any knowledge can be brought back to statements on the physical objects. In contemporary philosophy, physicalism is most frequently associated with the mind-body problem where it holds that all that has been ascribed to “mind” is more correctly ascribed to “brain” or the activity of the brain.

Anthropology #1: What Is It?

“Anthropology is the study of people throughout the world, their evolutionary history, how they behave, adapt to different environments, communicate and socialise with one another. The study of anthropology is concerned both with the biological features that make us human (such as physiology, genetic makeup, nutritional history and evolution) and with social aspects (such as language, culture, politics, family and religion). Whether studying a religious community in London, or human evolutionary fossils in the UAE, anthropologists are concerned with many aspects of people’s lives: the everyday practices as well as the more dramatic rituals, ceremonies and processes which define us as human beings. A few common questions posed by anthropology are: how are societies different and how are they the same? how has evolution shaped how we think? what is culture? are there human universals? By taking the time to study peoples’ lives in detail, anthropologists explore what makes us uniquely human. In doing so, anthropologists aim to increase our understanding of ourselves and of each other.

What do anthropologists do?
While a few anthropology postgraduates go on to work as lecturers or researchers within academia, a significant number are increasingly finding employment in a variety of sectors, ranging from education, charity and international development, to medicine and health-related professions, film and business. Often anthropologists do not follow linear career trajectories, but become involved in various projects in frequently overlapping career sectors. Take a look at our career paths section for case studies, websites and information on careers in anthropology.

Common misconceptions about anthropology
Anthropology as subject is not well known amongst the general population in Britain. As anthropology has not until now been taught at secondary school level (except as an option within the International Baccalaureate), the British general public’s exposure to anthropology tends to be limited to museums, occasional newspaper articles, or TV programmes whose primary aim is entertainment. The result is that many misconceptions about anthropology persist. A common one is that anthropology is mainly about ‘bones and fossils’. These are indeed the special concern of biological and evolutionary anthropologists, who use the evidence of human remains and living sites to reconstruct the bodies, diets and environments of our prehuman ancestors. Social and cultural anthropology, however, is concerned with social relations in the ‘here and now’. A second misconception is that social anthropologists exclusively study ‘tribal’ peoples in ‘remote’ areas, whose cultural practices are perceived as ‘exotic’. While it is true that some anthropologists carry out their research in places far from metropolitan centres, there are many others who undertake research in their home towns, in urban settings or in the industrial workplace. A third misconception is that anthropology and archaeology are one and the same. In North America archaeology is considered a branch of anthropology, whereas in Britain, archaeology is considered as a separate sister discipline to anthropology. Generally speaking, archaeology is about people and cultures in the near or distant past, and social anthropology is about present-day peoples and cultures.”

Source: https://www.discoveranthropology.org.uk/about-anthropology/what-is-anthropology.html

Philosophy #18: Positivism

Positivism is a philosophy of science based on the view that in the social as well as natural sciences, data derived from sensory experience, and logical and mathematical treatments of such data, are together the exclusive source of all authentic knowledge. Obtaining and verifying data that can be received from the senses is known as empirical evidence. Society operates according to laws like the physical world. Introspective and intuitional attempts to gain knowledge are rejected.

Psychedelics #6: DMT

“DMT, or N,N-Dimethyltryptamine, is a psychedelic chemical that occurs naturally in both plants and animals from underwater organisms to land mammals. DMT is also the active hallucinogenic compound in ayahuasca, a tea brewed from the shrub Psychotria viridis used for ritual purposes by indigenous people in the Amazon.

People also ingest DMT in crystal form, smoking it in a pipe or bong, as well as vaporized. This form of ingestion produces a powerful but short-lasting hallucinogenic state, considered to be one of the most intense psychedelic experiences in existence.

It can also retain its psychoactive properties in other forms, including psilocybin (4-PO-HO-DMT, found in psilocybin mushrooms).

Many often confuse DMT with 5-MeO-DMT, or 5-Methoxy-N,N-Dimethyltryptamine, which is also a hallucinogenic compound. 5-MeO-DMT looks exactly like DMT on both a macro and micro level, but the latter has a few extra atoms attached, which is enough to change the experience. While the DMT experience tends to be highly visual, 5-MeO-DMT is more like a perspective shift. For this guide, we’ll focus on DMT.

Benefits

DMT is found in the human brain, so our bodies are accustomed to handling this molecule. Research suggests that it plays an important role in various processes taking place in the central and peripheral nervous systems. DMT trips are so short-lived because our bodies are so good at metabolizing it. All of this makes it is a fairly safe compound to ingest—and helps us understand the potential benefits of a DMT trip.

For centuries, indigenous people have used DMT for healing and change, and, more recently, science is backing this up. Johns Hopkins researchers recently conducted a survey into the anti-depressant qualities of 5-MeO-DMT and found that the use of the compound resulted in huge improvements in well-being—among 362 adults, around 80% of respondents reported improvements in anxiety and depression. Another study, conducted with rats, found that microdosing DMT also led to positive improvements with anxiety and depression.

All of this could have something to do with DMT’s propensity to creating god- or spirit-like hallucinations. After all, there’s a reason Rick Strassman called it “the spirit molecule”—and a reason the name has stuck. With many psychedelics, studies show that the more a person experiences certain “mystical” qualities during a trip, the more healing they receive, it’s believed that DMT’s ability to make users “see God” could be the key to its healing powers.

However, very little systematic research exists on DMT and spiritual experiences. This has caused some to question the direction of the relationship between psychedelic use and spirituality. Does DMT aid in spiritual growth, or do people who are inclined to seek spiritual growth end up taking DMT?

From what we can tell, it’s probably a bit of both.”

Source: https://www.google.com/amp/s/thethirdwave.co/psychedelics/dmt/amp/

Philosophy #7: Empiricism

Empiricism is a theory of knowledge that asserts that knowledge comes only or primarily via sensory experience. Empiricism emphasizes evidence, especially as discovered in experiments. It is a fundamental part of the scientific method that all hypotheses and theories must be tested against observations of the natural world rather than resting solely on a priori reasoning, intuition, or revelation.