Tag Archives: philosophy

Guest Post: Happiness

This is a guest post by: aarvii.wordpress.com

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Let’s talk about happiness Today..
“State of mind” you will find these words echoing whenever you ask anyone about it. Some will say it is joy that you find once you attain your goals or once you find the people you are seeking. I am still not able to absorb that. I won’t be philosophical but being at this point of my existence, though I might not be experienced enough to conclude that but being so dependent on others remarks and delivering our best to people only to find some recognition should not be the lone source of happiness, which is quite a thing nowadays. That state of mind which gets liberated once you find the words of identification is corrupt one. Liberating ourselves from all the dependencies and formulating our happiness majorly based on our inner self is what will make you achieve that true happiness. Once in a while lending a helping hand without asking for anything in return or having a cup of coffee alone can prove a major source of happiness for moments and all these moments build up your life and the story you are here to deliver. Materializing our happiness is a clear indication of our dependencies. Breaking yourself free of all the things that weigh you down, coming up as survivor all by yourself will boost you inner self and that boost which help you recognise your own self is a source of happiness. Have you found that boost or that inner self yet???

You can find this blogger here: aarvii.wordpress.com

Philosophical Questions #2: Does Knowledge Have Intrinsic Value Or Does It Need To Have A Practical Use To Have Value?

Knowledge is a familiarity, awareness, or understanding of someone or something, such as facts, skills, or objects. By most accounts, knowledge can be acquired in many different ways and from many sources, including but not limited to perception, reason, memory, testimony, scientific inquiry, education, and practice.

Value is the regard that something is held to deserve; the importance, worth, or usefulness of something.

So, does knowledge have intrinsic value or does it need to have a practical use to be valuable?

I would say knowledge does have intrinsic value, knowledge doesn’t have to have a practical use to be valuable. For example, we could have knowledge of the universe that isn’t practical to be able to be applied to life but is intrinsically valuable to us for our understanding.

But then isn’t that practical if we know something? Oh dear, down the rabbit hole again..

Philosophical Questions #1: Is There Free-Will?

Can anybody have free-will if we make choices based on past knowledge which we gain through experiences; making choices by our perception. Hence is there free-will?

Free will is defined as the ability to choose between different possible courses of action unimpeded. Free will is closely linked to the concepts of moral responsibility, praise, guilt, sin, and other judgements which apply only to actions that are freely chosen.

Religion #2: Buddhism

“Buddhism is a spiritual tradition that focuses on personal spiritual development and the attainment of a deep insight into the true nature of life. There are 376 million followers worldwide.

Buddhists seek to reach a state of nirvana, following the path of the Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama, who went on a quest for Enlightenment around the sixth century BC.

There is no belief in a personal god. Buddhists believe that nothing is fixed or permanent and that change is always possible. The path to Enlightenment is through the practice and development of morality, meditation and wisdom.

Buddhists believe that life is both endless and subject to impermanence, suffering and uncertainty. These states are called the tilakhana, or the three signs of existence. Existence is endless because individuals are reincarnated over and over again, experiencing suffering throughout many lives.

It is impermanent because no state, good or bad, lasts forever. Our mistaken belief that things can last is a chief cause of suffering.

The history of Buddhism is the story of one man’s spiritual journey to enlightenment, and of the teachings and ways of living that developed from it.

The Buddha
Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, was born into a royal family in present-day Nepal over 2500 years ago. He lived a life of privilege and luxury until one day he left the royal enclosure and encountered for the first time, an old man, a sick man, and a corpse. Disturbed by this he became a monk before adopting the harsh poverty of Indian asceticism. Neither path satisfied him and he decided to pursue the ‘Middle Way’ – a life without luxury but also without poverty.

Buddhists believe that one day, seated beneath the Bodhi tree (the tree of awakening), Siddhartha became deeply absorbed in meditation and reflected on his experience of life until he became enlightened.

By finding the path to enlightenment, Siddhartha was led from the pain of suffering and rebirth towards the path of enlightenment and became known as the Buddha or ‘awakened one’.

Schools of Buddhism
There are numerous different schools or sects of Buddhism. The two largest are Theravada Buddhism, which is most popular in Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Thailand, Laos and Burma (Myanmar), and Mahayana Buddhism, which is strongest in Tibet, China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, and Mongolia.

The majority of Buddhist sects do not seek to proselytise (preach and convert), with the notable exception of Nichiren Buddhism.

All schools of Buddhism seek to aid followers on a path of enlightenment.

Key facts
-Buddhism is 2,500 years old
-There are currently 376 million followers worldwide
-There are over 150,000 Buddhists in Britain
-Buddhism arose as a result of Siddhartha Gautama’s quest for Enlightenment in around the 6th Century BC
-There is no belief in a personal God. It is not centred on the relationship between humanity and God
-Buddhists believe that nothing is fixed or permanent – change is always possible
-The two main Buddhist sects are Theravada Buddhism and Mahayana Buddhism, but there are many more
Buddhists can worship both at home or at a temple
-The path to Enlightenment is through the practice and development of morality, meditation and wisdom.”

Source: https://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/buddhism/ataglance/glance.shtml

Poetry #43: Existential Oblivion

There’s a lot

I hide

Deep inside

Smothered my soul

In laughter and gold

Yet deep in me

There’s a well of pain

I haven’t looked at

Because

Of the psychological distress

That messes with my head

I know there are more of you out there

We are truly lit up

Even if appeared to be in the dark you see

You have this free

Infinity, you never die,

You never are born

You’ve done this all before

From this higher mind

It is all a harmonica

Of muffled voices

Turning into duality

Beyound duality

Into the expansion of mind

There is no time

What can I do now?

Keep living in this bizzare world

Of corruption and lies

Spies

And

Evil

Evil is also good you see

These are concepts

We have developed

Yes in the human and soul eyes they are wrong

On that dimensional thinking

Step higher in your frequency

Yet they are also you and me

I plea

For you to look even deeper

In your understanding

Of what good and evil is

And what your concepts are

Where did they come from?

Who are you?

-Amber @diosraw 29/12/20 23:32PM