Tag Archives: lessons

Spirituality #1: Soul Groups

“A Soul Group is comprised of a single person or group of people that your Soul energetically resonates with on a mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual level at any given moment.

These people are members of the same “Spirit Family” as you and they share an intensely strong bond with you that transcends time and space itself. Intuitively, most people tend to describe this connection as sharing the same “frequency” or “vibration” because of the deep harmony felt among such people.

Such a deep and harmonious connection goes beyond sharing the same surface-based personality tastes, hobbies and opinions: it’s an intense magnetic and spiritual bond you will feel that is inexplicable to the mind.

Therefore, your Soul Group is often described as being comprised of Souls that are cut from the same “energetic cloth” as you. But this deep connection isn’t necessarily romantic.

There are many different types of Soul Group connections that you can develop including soul friends, soulmates, kindred spirits, and twin flames — but they’re all fundamentally the same thing with different functions and unique purposes.

Essentially, a Soul connection happens when two people of the same vibrational frequency energetically overlap and share each other’s thoughts, feelings, values, and dreams. Although you might come from different cultures, races, or opposite backgrounds, you will immediately sense an ancient and strong connection in your bones, blood, and very Soul.

Why Do We Have Soul Groups?

To me, the most valuable social experience a person can have is meeting a member of their Soul Group. The defining quality of this type of person is that they make it impossible for you to remain the same person by the time they make their exit.

Relationships, like nature itself, have many seasons. Uniting with a Soul Group member can last a few hours on a plane trip, or end after 60 years of friendship. Sometimes only physical death will end (if only momentarily) such connections.

Every member of your Soul Group will appear in your life to teach you a lesson and to catalyze your spiritual awakening. However, we are not always ready for our Soul Group – but even this is a lesson unto itself. As existential philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre once famously wrote, “Hell is other people.” Therefore, for some people, coming across a member of their Soul Group will feel like “hell,” especially if such a person is weighed down by negative mindsets, dogma, trauma, and the unwillingness to move beyond unconscious behavior.

On the other hand, for some people meeting members of the Soul Group will feel like heaven, as can be seen in the case of Twin Flame and Soulmate encounters. Essentially, how you feel about your Soul Group will be determined by how open you are to changing, growing, and moving past fear.

But the question still remains, why do we have Soul Groups?

Metaphysically speaking, Soul Groups are a natural product of the “flow” of Spirit. If you look at the Ocean, you’ll notice that sometimes clusters of waves arise. The same goes for Soul Groups: we are all Spirit, but we are also broken down into many different Soul Groups. These Soul Groups carry out certain roles, namely, to help each other embody the purpose of their Souls.

In other words, your Soul Family is here to help you learn, grow, and experience what ancient traditions have referred to as “moksha”, self-realization or enlightenment.

In many spiritual traditions, the obstacles that we face in this life are said to be chosen before birth; that we choose the family we’re born into, the bodies and personalities we develop, and the people we bring into our lives. These people are chosen because we knew they would give us the best chance to learn the many life lessons we needed in order to grow spiritually.

Historically, Soul Groups that gained a lot of force and traction created drastic social changes. Take, for instance, the Creative Renaissance, that was composed of figures such as Leonardo Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Machiavelli, Thomas More, Copernicus, Francis Bacon, Galileo, Martin Luther and William Shakespeare.

There was also the Spiritual Renaissance that was composed of figures such as Gautama Buddha, Mahavira, Makkhali Gosala, and Ajita Kesakambali. In China, there was Confucius, Lao Tzu, Mencius, Chuang Tzu, Lieh Tzu, and in Greece there was Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Heraclitus, and Pythagoras. All of these individuals interacted with each other in different ways that were necessary for a revolution to occur.

Each of these Soul Groups has expanded our collective growth and evolutionary progress. Not only that, but each coming generation will bring in waves of powerful and transformative energies that are built upon the previous progress of earlier Soul Families.

By finding your Soul Group, you grow at not only an individual level but also a collective level. Each plan, each path, is equally as important in the overall evolution of the whole.

It is only through this profound experience of relating to another on Soul level that drastic change can occur on both an inner and outer level.”

Source: https://lonerwolf.com/soul-group/

Civilisations #18: The Southwestern Culture

“Overview
The greater Southwest has long been occupied by hunter-gatherers and agricultural settlements. This area, comprised of modern-day Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Nevada, and the states of Sonora and Chihuahua in northern Mexico, has seen successive prehistoric cultural traditions since approximately 12,000 years ago. Three of the major cultural traditions that impacted the region include the Paleo-Indian tradition, the Southwestern Archaic tradition, and the Post-Archaic cultures tradition. As various cultures developed over time, many of them shared similarities in family structure and religious beliefs.

Southwestern Agriculture
Southwestern farmers probably began experimenting with agriculture by facilitating the growth of wild grains such as amaranth and chenopods as well as gourds for their edible seeds and shells. The earliest maize known to have been grown in the Southwest was a popcorn varietal measuring one to two inches long. It was not a very productive crop. More productive varieties were developed later by Southwestern farmers or introduced via Mesoamerica, though the drought-resistant tepary bean was native to the region. Cotton has been found at archaeological sites dating to about 1,200 BCE in the Tucson basin and was most likely cultivated by indigenous peoples in the region. Evidence of tobacco use and possibly the cultivation of tobacco, dates back to approximately the same time period.

Agave, especially agave murpheyi, was a major food source of the Hohokam and grown on dry hillsides where other crops would not grow. Early farmers also possibly cultivated cactus fruit, mesquite bean, and species of wild grasses for their edible seeds.

Paleolithic peoples utilized habitats near water sources like rivers, swamps, and marshes, which had an abundance of fish and attracted birds and game animals. They hunted big game—bison, mammoths, and ground sloths—who were also attracted to these water sources. A period of relatively wet conditions saw many cultures in the American Southwest flourish. Extensive irrigation systems were developed and were among the largest of the ancient world. Elaborate adobe and sandstone buildings were constructed, and highly ornamental and artistic pottery was created. The unusual weather conditions could not continue forever, however, and gave way in time, to the more common arid conditions of the area. These dry conditions necessitated a more minimal way of life and, eventually, the elaborate accomplishments of these cultures were abandoned.

During this time, the people of the Southwest developed a variety of subsistence strategies, all using their own specific techniques. The nutritive value of weed and grass seeds was discovered and flat rocks were used to grind flour to produce gruels and breads. The use of grinding slabs originated around 7,500 BCE and marks the beginning of the Archaic tradition. Small bands of people traveled throughout the area gathering plants such as cactus fruits, mesquite beans, acorns, and pine nuts. Archaic people established camps at collection points, and returned to these places year after year.

The American Indian Archaic culture eventually evolved into two major prehistoric archaeological culture areas in the American Southwest and northern Mexico. These cultures, sometimes referred to as Oasisamerica, are characterized by dependence on agriculture, formal social stratification, population clusters, and major architecture. One of the major cultures that developed during this time was the Pueblo peoples, formerly referred to as the Anasazi. Their distinctive pottery and dwelling construction styles emerged in the area around 750 CE. Ancestral Pueblo peoples are renowned for the construction of and cultural achievement present at Pueblo Bonito and other sites in Chaco Canyon, as well as Mesa Verde, Aztec Ruins, and Salmon Ruins. Other cultural traditions that developed during this time include the Hohokam and Mogollon traditions.

Family And Religion
Paleolithic peoples in the Southwest initially structured their families and communities into highly mobile traveling groups of approximately 20 to 50 members, moving place to place as resources were depleted and additional supplies were needed. As cultural traditions began to evolve throughout the Southwest between 7,500 BCE to 1,550 CE, many cultures developed similar social and religious traditions. For the Pueblos and other Southwest American Indian communities, the transition from a hunting-gathering, nomadic experience to more permanent agricultural settlements meant more firmly established families and communities. Climate change that occurred about 3,500 years ago during the Archaic period, however, changed patterns in water sources, dramatically decreasing the population of indigenous peoples. Many family-based groups took shelter in caves and rock overhangs within canyon walls, many of which faced south to capitalize on warmth from the sun during the winter. Occasionally, these peoples lived in small, semi-sedentary hamlets in open areas.

Many Southwest tribes during the Post-Archaic period lived in a range of structures that included small family pit houses, larger structures to house clans, grand pueblos, and cliff-sited dwellings for defense. These communities developed complex networks that stretched across the Colorado Plateau, linking hundreds of neighborhoods and population centers.

While southwestern tribes developed more permanent family structures and established complex communities, they also developed and shared a similar understanding of the spiritual and natural world. Many of the tribes that made up the Southwest Culture practiced animism and shamanism. Shamanism encompasses the premise that shamans are intermediaries or messengers between the human world and the spirit worlds. At the same time, animism encompasses the beliefs that there is no separation between the spiritual and physical (or material) world, and that souls or spirits exist not only in humans, but also in some other animals, plants, rocks, and geographic features such as mountains or rivers, or other entities of the natural environment, including thunder, wind, and shadows.

Conclusion
Although at present there are a variety of contemporary cultural traditions that exist in the greater Southwest, many of these traditions still incorporate similar religious aspects that are found in animism and shamanism. Some of these cultural traditions include the Yuman-speaking peoples inhabiting the Colorado River valley, the uplands, and Baja California; O’odham peoples of southern Arizona and northern Sonora; and the Pueblo peoples of Arizona and New Mexico.”

Source: https://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-hccc-worldcivilization/chapter/southwestern-culture/

Ego Lessons

We are currently being tested by our higher selves to determine how much of our ego lessons we have mastered. You may have noticed over the past two to three weeks that there are an unusual amount of people “Acting Out” with flared up egos, uneasiness, and restlessness. It’s like we are under a pressure cooker and are facing some of the most difficult challenges we have ever faced. This is a reminder for us to identify and release all of our old programmings and release karmic loops. We can do this by choosing not to react negatively when challenged by others Egos. There is a fine line between maintaining your self boundaries over self-defense and engaging in negativity. Never allow anyone to trespass your sacred space or to disturb your peace. But also remember to immediately disengage from negativity and not participate in these ego games. By detaching from negativity and anchoring more and more peace into our lives we are all contributing by anchoring the frequency of peace into the energy grids of Gaia.

Jewels In Our Experiences As Lessons To Evolve

Life is a soul school and we are here to evolve by learning. Lessons are there in our daily life experiences. Why does that thing keep coming up or crossing your path repeatedly? Maybe there is a jewel in there, a lesson for you to evolve.

Life is a mirror. Unresolved issues on the inside will be reflecfed in our outer world.