Tag Archives: knowledge

Religion #15: Candomblé

“Candomblé is a religion based on African beliefs which is particularly popular in Brazil. It is also practised in other countries, and has as many as two million followers.

The religion is a mixture of traditional Yoruba, Fon and Bantu beliefs which originated from different regions in Africa. It has also incorporated some aspects of the Catholic faith over time.

A religion which combines elements of many religions is called a syncretic religion.

Enslaved Africans brought their beliefs with them when they were shipped to Brazil during the slave trade.

The name Candomblé means ‘dance in honour of the gods’.

Practitioners of Candomblé believe in one all powerful God called Oludumaré who is served by lesser deities. These deities are called orixas. (They can also be called voduns and inkices.)

Candomblé practitioners believe that every person has their own individual orixa which controls his or her destiny and acts as a protector.

Music and dance are important parts of Candomblé ceremonies. Specially choreographed dances are performed by worshippers to enable them to become possessed by the orixas.

There is no concept of good or bad in Candomblé. Each person is only required to fulfil his or her destiny to the fullest, regardless of what that is.

Candomblé is an oral tradition and therefore has no holy scriptures.

The first official temple was founded at the beginning of the 19th century in Salvador, Bahia in Brazil.”

Source: https://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/candomble/ataglance/glance.shtml

Spirituality #3: Soul Mates

“So what is a soul mate? In my experience, this is what really defines a soul mate:

-Soul mates are your best friends. They’re also your romantic and sexual partners. (You can also have very deep connections with friends, family members and animals – I refer to these as soul friends – but other people also refer to them as soul mates).

-Soul mates are your mirrors. They reflect back to you your own flaws, insecurities, dreams and strengths to help you grow to the fullest. You can rely on them to be honest with you, completely honest, even to the point of not sparing your feelings because they care about you that much.

-Soul mates are your spiritual catalysts. They don’t complete you, but they do help you to become the best version of yourself possible. Why don’t they complete you? Because you are already complete at your core, and throughout the course of your life you are in the process of rediscovering that.

-Soul mates are your confidants and teachers. Sometimes the lessons they teach are intentional, but often the lessons they teach are unintentional and are a by-product of your relationship with them. Because they understand you so deeply, soul mates also make powerful confidants, helping you through tough times and inspiring you to do and be your very best.

-Soul mates feel very “familiar.” This is possibly because you have spent many past lives with them. Something between the two of you just clicks, as though you have been friends and lovers forever.

-Soul mates often know you better than you know yourself. Therefore, they can empathize with you at a core level.

-Soul mates vibrate at the same frequency as you. This is just a fancy way of saying that soul mates not only share your likes, tastes and goals, but they also share your deeper life values, beliefs and dreams. You both “get” each other on a DNA level.

-Soul mates love you unconditionally. You also love them unconditionally. Although it may not be possible for soul mates to always stay together, it is impossible for soul mates to harbor feelings of hatred for each other for long periods of time. Despite what they do, you still love them, and they still love you.

-Soul mates aren’t perfect. They have their annoying flaws, gross habits and strange quirks, but they are still amazing people deep down.

-Soul mates aren’t always immediately recognizable. Love at first sight isn’t a myth, but it also isn’t the only way you can discover who your soul mate is. Often soul mates appear in various “disguises” in our lives.

-Soul mates don’t always stay with you for a lifetime. This is an extremely harmful myth that I’d love to squash once and for all! Soul mates don’t always stay until the end, but this is not a bad thing. We like to think that our lovers will be there forever because it is a comforting and sentimental thought. But sometimes life has different plans for us. Unfortunately the destruction of this ideal has wrought untold amounts of misery in people’s lives that I have witnessed firsthand. Sometimes soul mates are there for only a season, and sometimes they are there for a lifetime. But whatever the case, enjoy the ride.

-There is the possibility to find multiple soul mates – although most people only tend to find one person who they are deeply compatible with. I personally have never had more than one soul mate/twin flame, so I can’t speak from experience. But I have known other people who have claimed to have had multiple profound relationships.”

Source: https://lonerwolf.com/what-is-a-soul-mate/

Symbols #8: Earth Medicine Wheel

Originated from the Native Americans, the Earth Medicine Wheel represents harmony. It is also an attempt to establish peaceful interaction amidst the four elements of the Earth. People use it to manifest spiritual energy and strengthen their inner vision.

It is also known as the Sacred Hoop or Sacred Circle used among Native Americans since so many generations for healing and teaching, both simultaneously. There are many interpretations about the medicine wheel but each of them establishes a connection with the cosmic things.

Shamanism #5: The Five Elements

“In nearly every indigenous culture on Earth, all of life is thought to be made up of a handful of elements. Depending on where you get your information, there are either four or five of these sacred building blocks of creation, each carrying their own innate wisdom. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the elements are wood, fire, metal, earth, and water. In medieval alchemy, it was thought that four elements- earth, water, air, and fire, were the main players in every process on the planet. Many shamanic traditions, including modern New Age philosophy, have added a fifth element, Spirit (also called ether), to the alchemical collection, and we will explore these components here.

Our ancestors tapped into these elements for everything in life- nourishment, inspiration, knowledge, surrender, and empowerment. These five energies were essential to living in harmony and balance with all that is, and were considered the main “food groups” of daily existence. Our physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual bodies are constantly being fed and supported by these elements, whether we are aware of them or not. Over the centuries, we have lost touch with the delicate frequencies of the five elements, and our relationship to them. Each one brings its own wisdom and intuition.

A quick note: this is the Western 5-element theory, which isn’t to be confused with the Eastern or TCM 5-element theory.

1. WATER
The fluid movements of water invite us into a place of creativity and surrender. Water does not get stuck on problems, but simply flows around them, finding a new path. This element works with our bodies to provide hydration, nourishment, and lubrication, and aids in physical movement, alertness, digestion, and detoxification. Water washes away what is no longer needed in the moment, and does not stop to second-guess its own power. In ceremony, water is used to bless, purify, and cleanse.

2. AIR
The air element is ripe with inspiration (a word that shares an origin with “to breathe”) and life force energy. Air moves in to blow away the dust, create change, and ignite our intellect. We can work with the air element with our own breath, inviting fresh, cleansing air to infuse our cells, awaken our minds, and move oxygen into our blood. Air is invigorating and clarifying, and provides the buoyancy for birds and other spirit messengers to travel and deliver their wisdom.

3. FIRE
Hot and bright, the fire element is all about bringing the light where there is none. Fire burns with intense energy, warming our hearts and souls, in a flame of hope and action. The sun is a classic example of fire energy, rising and setting each day in a sacred cycle that reminds us of optimism and new beginnings. Fire is powerfully transformative- burning away the old to create space for the new, and calls us to keep our inner purpose burning bright. In ritual, fire is thought to cleanse the soul, as well as deliver prayers to the Heavens.

4. EARTH
The grounded and stable earth element is the embodiment of our Pacha Mama’s (Earth Mother) wisdom. The earth provides nourishment, safety, security, and a place in which to sow our seeds of manifestation. We experience this element in the bounty of fruit, flowers, herbs, roots, and vegetables, as well as through the vibrations of crystals, minerals, and stones. The element of earth is protective and empowering, and is important for our survival.

5. SPIRIT
The most ethereal of elements, pure Spirit is what gives the life force energy to all that we experience. This element weaves through every fiber of the natural world, infusing everything with a living vibration, an active aspect of the Divine. Pure Spirit is what animates the other elements, and forms our connection to the Universe. It is representative of the invisible thread that holds our existence together.

There are a lot of ways that you can work with the wisdom of the five elements.”

Source: https://www.abrighterwild.com/blog/an-intro-to-the-five-elements

Symbols #7: Caduceus

This spiritual symbol is represented by two snakes spiraling around a winged figure. Often confused with the symbol Rod of Asclepius (symbol of medicine), Caduceus is the traditional symbol of Hermes. It dates back to both Greek and Egyptian Mythology and represents the planet, Mercury.
Both the snakes in this spiritual symbol represent the masculine and feminine energy in life which when intertwined, the person is filled with life energy and develops the wings of a new life. In this way, it also symbolizes the primal forces of life energy.

Religion #13: Zoroastrianism

“Zoroastrianism is one of the world’s oldest monotheistic religions. It was founded by the Prophet Zoroaster (or Zarathustra) in ancient Iran approximately 3500 years ago.

For 1000 years Zoroastrianism was one of the most powerful religions in the world. It was the official religion of Persia (Iran) from 600 BCE to 650 CE.

It is now one of the world’s smallest religions. In 2006 the New York Times reported that there were probably less than 190,000 followers worldwide at that time.

Zoroastrians believe there is one God called Ahura Mazda (Wise Lord) and He created the world.

Zoroastrians are not fire-worshippers, as some Westerners wrongly believe.

Zoroastrians believe that the elements are pure and that fire represents God’s light or wisdom.

Ahura Mazda revealed the truth through the Prophet, Zoroaster.

Zoroastrians traditionally pray several times a day.

Zoroastrians worship communally in a Fire Temple or Agiary.

The Zoroastrian book of Holy Scriptures is called The Avesta.

The Avesta can be roughly split into two main sections:

The Avesta is the oldest and core part of the scriptures, which contains the Gathas. The Gathas are seventeen hymns thought to be composed by Zoroaster himself.

The Younger Avesta – commentaries to the older Avestan written in later years. It also contains myths, stories and details of ritual observances.

Zoroastrians are roughly split into two groups:
-The Iranians
-The Parsis”

Source: https://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/zoroastrian/ataglance/glance.shtml

Biographies #1: Aldous Huxley

“Early Years

Aldous Huxley was born July 26, 1894, in the village of Godalming, Surrey, England. The third son of Leonard Huxley, a writer, editor, and teacher, and Julia Arnold, also a teacher, the young Aldous grew up in a family of well-connected, well-known writers, scientists, and educators.

At Aldous’ birth, the Huxley family and their relatives already commanded literary and philosophical attention in Victorian England. Huxley’s grandfather, biologist T. H. Huxley, gained recognition in the nineteenth century as the writer who introduced Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution to a wide public and coined the word “agnostic.” The elder Huxley’s writing contributed to the growing debate on science and religion, a theme that would capture the imagination of his grandson, Aldous.

Huxley’s mother was a niece of poet and essayist Matthew Arnold, who expressed the moral struggles of the modern age and the retreat of a religion-based culture. Matthew’s father, Thomas Arnold, head of Rugby School, had presided with earnest devotion over the theory and practice of education in his time. Thus Aldous grew up in an atmosphere in which thought on science, religion, and education informed and even dominated family life.

Living up to the expectations of “Grandpater,” as T. H. Huxley was known in his family, constituted a full-time, exhausting job for the children — Aldous included. Academic and professional brilliance was expected as a matter of course, with no excuses allowed. A family tendency toward depression compounded by this pressure may have contributed to the suicide of Trevenan, Aldous’ elder brother.

At sixteen, the sudden onset of keratitis punctate, an eye disease, left Aldous nearly blind and almost ruined his own chances for success. Fortunately, surgery corrected some of his vision, but Huxley would suffer from complications in vision for the rest of his life.

Education

Like all the sons of his family, Huxley attended Eton, a prestigious preparatory school, and Balliol College, Oxford. His education, then, represented a privileged road to power for wealthy and well-born British men who sometimes displayed real brilliance. Huxley was among the best of them, certainly. Poor sight caused by the eye disease prevented his pursuit of his first career choice, medicine, but he threw himself into study of literature, reading with the help of a magnifying glass. In 1915, Huxley took a First (highest honors) in English Literature.

A less formal, but nonetheless important part of Huxley’s education was his regular attendance at Lady Ottoline Morrell’s get-togethers, which provided many literary, artistic, and political reformers and experimenters the chance to meet and talk. Here Huxley met novelist Virginia Woolf, economist John Maynard Keynes, and critics Bertrand Russell and Clive Bell — some of the most important writers and thinkers of the time. Huxley’s early exposure to the ideas of such a diverse and progressive group deeply influenced his world-view and his writing.

Jobs

After taking his degree at Oxford, Huxley returned to Eton to teach. Among his pupils was Eric Blair, who would later write such classics as 1984 and Animal Farm under the pseudonym “George Orwell.”

From 1919 to 1921, Huxley worked as an editor on the London journal Athenaeum, one of the best-known publications of the time. Huxley also contributed to Vanity Fair and Vogue before devoting himself entirely to his own fiction and essay writing in 1924.

Literary Writing

Huxley’s first published work was a collection of his poetry, The Burning Wheel (1916), written when he was still in his early twenties. French novelist Marcel Proust praised Huxley’s early efforts, and Huxley seemed destined for life as a poet. But with the publication of his first two novels, Crome Yellow (1921) and Antic Hay (1923), Huxley emerged as a particularly witty chronicler of modern life among the educated and pretentious.

Huxley further solidified his reputation as a satirist with the novel Point Counter Point (1928), a scathing study of the breakdown of commonly held social values. Huxley followed up with another satire, which would prove to be his most popular work — Brave New World (1932).

Like his previous novels, Brave New World is a “novel of ideas,” in which the themes the author wishes to explore take center stage, determining the action as well as the characterization. Brave New World continued in Huxley’s familiar irreverent fictional style, showing readers the absurdity of strongly held but little examined beliefs.

The work also marked a change in Huxley himself. The setting of Brave New World — a future London rather than the familiar country houses and town houses of his previous fiction — seems to have broken Huxley out of some habits of mind. In Brave New World, Huxley takes the problem of evil much more seriously than in the past. The satirist had begun to evolve into the social philosopher.

After the publication of Brave New World, Huxley left England, living with his wife, Maria, first in New Mexico — the site of the Savage Reservation in Brave New World — and later in California, where surgery restored much of his vision.

In his new home, Huxley became involved in the study and practice of mysticism. His new philosophical outlook informed his novel Eyeless in Gaza (1936), which promoted pacifism on the eve of World War II. After Many a Summer Dies the Swan (1939) makes the case for the emptiness of materialism. Gradually, Huxley moved toward mystical writings, far from the tone of his early satire. The Perennial Philosophy (1945) and The Doors of Perception (1954) represent Huxley’s non-fictional expression of his interests, including even experimentation with psychedelic drugs.

In Los Angeles, Huxley wrote screenplays for film versions of fictional classics such as Jane Eyre, Pride and Prejudice, and Alice in Wonderland. He also continued writing fiction, notably Ape and Essence (1948), a futuristic fiction set in Los Angeles after a nuclear war. With Grey Eminence (1941) and The Devils of Loudon (1952), Huxley looked backward to historical events to examine what he believed to be the hypocrisy of organized religion. In addition to his fiction and screenplays, the planning and writing of biographies, essays, and other works of non-fiction occupied him constantly during these years.

Huxley’s last novel, Island (1962), returns to the theme of the future he once explored so memorably in Brave New World. The later novel, in which Huxley tried to create a positive vision of the future, failed to come up to readers’ expectations. Brave New World Revisited, a series of essays addressing the themes of his early novel, represents a more successful rethinking of future (and present) social challenges.

Huxley died of cancer in California on November 22, 1963. Although his novels — especially Brave New World — still enjoyed great popularity, Huxley’s death received little notice in the media at the time. The nation’s shock over the assassination of President John F. Kennedy overshadowed news of the writer’s death.

Honors and Awards

Huxley won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction from the University of Edinburgh in 1939 for his novel After Many a Summer Dies the Swan. In 1959, he received the Award of Merit and Gold Medal from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters and accepted an honorary Doctor of Letters degree from the University of California. The year before his death, he received the Companion of Literature from the British Royal Society of Literature.”

Source: https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/b/brave-new-world/aldous-huxley-biography

Spirituality #1: Soul Groups

“A Soul Group is comprised of a single person or group of people that your Soul energetically resonates with on a mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual level at any given moment.

These people are members of the same “Spirit Family” as you and they share an intensely strong bond with you that transcends time and space itself. Intuitively, most people tend to describe this connection as sharing the same “frequency” or “vibration” because of the deep harmony felt among such people.

Such a deep and harmonious connection goes beyond sharing the same surface-based personality tastes, hobbies and opinions: it’s an intense magnetic and spiritual bond you will feel that is inexplicable to the mind.

Therefore, your Soul Group is often described as being comprised of Souls that are cut from the same “energetic cloth” as you. But this deep connection isn’t necessarily romantic.

There are many different types of Soul Group connections that you can develop including soul friends, soulmates, kindred spirits, and twin flames — but they’re all fundamentally the same thing with different functions and unique purposes.

Essentially, a Soul connection happens when two people of the same vibrational frequency energetically overlap and share each other’s thoughts, feelings, values, and dreams. Although you might come from different cultures, races, or opposite backgrounds, you will immediately sense an ancient and strong connection in your bones, blood, and very Soul.

Why Do We Have Soul Groups?

To me, the most valuable social experience a person can have is meeting a member of their Soul Group. The defining quality of this type of person is that they make it impossible for you to remain the same person by the time they make their exit.

Relationships, like nature itself, have many seasons. Uniting with a Soul Group member can last a few hours on a plane trip, or end after 60 years of friendship. Sometimes only physical death will end (if only momentarily) such connections.

Every member of your Soul Group will appear in your life to teach you a lesson and to catalyze your spiritual awakening. However, we are not always ready for our Soul Group – but even this is a lesson unto itself. As existential philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre once famously wrote, “Hell is other people.” Therefore, for some people, coming across a member of their Soul Group will feel like “hell,” especially if such a person is weighed down by negative mindsets, dogma, trauma, and the unwillingness to move beyond unconscious behavior.

On the other hand, for some people meeting members of the Soul Group will feel like heaven, as can be seen in the case of Twin Flame and Soulmate encounters. Essentially, how you feel about your Soul Group will be determined by how open you are to changing, growing, and moving past fear.

But the question still remains, why do we have Soul Groups?

Metaphysically speaking, Soul Groups are a natural product of the “flow” of Spirit. If you look at the Ocean, you’ll notice that sometimes clusters of waves arise. The same goes for Soul Groups: we are all Spirit, but we are also broken down into many different Soul Groups. These Soul Groups carry out certain roles, namely, to help each other embody the purpose of their Souls.

In other words, your Soul Family is here to help you learn, grow, and experience what ancient traditions have referred to as “moksha”, self-realization or enlightenment.

In many spiritual traditions, the obstacles that we face in this life are said to be chosen before birth; that we choose the family we’re born into, the bodies and personalities we develop, and the people we bring into our lives. These people are chosen because we knew they would give us the best chance to learn the many life lessons we needed in order to grow spiritually.

Historically, Soul Groups that gained a lot of force and traction created drastic social changes. Take, for instance, the Creative Renaissance, that was composed of figures such as Leonardo Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Machiavelli, Thomas More, Copernicus, Francis Bacon, Galileo, Martin Luther and William Shakespeare.

There was also the Spiritual Renaissance that was composed of figures such as Gautama Buddha, Mahavira, Makkhali Gosala, and Ajita Kesakambali. In China, there was Confucius, Lao Tzu, Mencius, Chuang Tzu, Lieh Tzu, and in Greece there was Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Heraclitus, and Pythagoras. All of these individuals interacted with each other in different ways that were necessary for a revolution to occur.

Each of these Soul Groups has expanded our collective growth and evolutionary progress. Not only that, but each coming generation will bring in waves of powerful and transformative energies that are built upon the previous progress of earlier Soul Families.

By finding your Soul Group, you grow at not only an individual level but also a collective level. Each plan, each path, is equally as important in the overall evolution of the whole.

It is only through this profound experience of relating to another on Soul level that drastic change can occur on both an inner and outer level.”

Source: https://lonerwolf.com/soul-group/

Did You Know #29: How Many Crystals Are There On Earth?

More than 4,000 naturally occurring minerals—inorganic solids that have a characteristic chemical composition and specific crystal structure—have been found on Earth. They are formed of simple molecules or individual elements arranged in repeating chains, sheets, or three-dimensional arrays.

Religion #12: Paganism

“Paganism describes a group of contemporary religions based on a reverence for nature. These faiths draw on the traditional religions of indigenous peoples throughout the world.

Paganism encompasses a diverse community.

Wiccans, Druids, Shamans, Sacred Ecologists, Odinists and Heathens all make up parts of the Pagan community.

Some groups concentrate on specific traditions or practices such as ecology, witchcraft, Celtic traditions or certain gods.

Most Pagans share an ecological vision that comes from the Pagan belief in the organic vitality and spirituality of the natural world.

Due to persecution and misrepresentation it is necessary to define what Pagans are not as well as what they are. Pagans are not sexual deviants, do not worship the devil, are not evil, do not practice ‘black magic’ and their practices do not involve harming people or animals.

The Pagan Federation of Great Britain have no precise figures but estimate that the number of Pagans in the British Isles is between 50,000 and 200,000 (2002).”

Source: https://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/paganism/ataglance/glance.shtml

Ace & Amber Poetry #1: Spirit Conversation

Listening to your soul, what do you hear?

All paths lead home my dear

What is happening in this universal sphere?

Frequencies of love so near

Lost in the dark is the fear

Returning to the dream

We are travelling through the soul stream

All playing a part in each other’s journey

You are me,

I am you

We’ll both pull through

Thoughts of the earthly realm just flew

Distractions came, but we grew

Ascension is within

We are rising with our fellow kin

Letting go of the game outside

Creating your reality inside

Tapping into your hearts light

Overcoming this inner fight

Rejoicing in synchronicitic delight

-By Ace (fearlessfreesoul.com) & Amber (diosraw.com)

Religion #11: Rastafari

“Rastafari is a young, Africa-centred religion which developed in Jamaica in the 1930s, following the coronation of Haile Selassie I as King of Ethiopia in 1930.

Rastafarians believe Haile Selassie is God and that he will return to Africa members of the black community who are living in exile as the result of colonisation and the slave trade.

Rastafari theology developed from the ideas of Marcus Garvey, a political activist who wanted to improve the status of fellow blacks.

There are approximately one million world wide adherents of Rastafari as a faith. The 2001 census found 5,000 Rastafarians living in England and Wales.

Followers of Rastafari are known by a variety of names: Rastafarians, Rastas, Sufferers, Locksmen, Dreads or Dreadlocks.

It spread globally following the success of Bob Marley and his music in the 1970s.

Rastafarians believe that blacks are the chosen people of God, but that through colonisation and the slave trade their role has been suppressed.

The movement’s greatest concerns are the repatriation of blacks to their homeland, Africa, and the reinstatement of blacks’ position in society.

It is an exocentric religion – as Haile Selassie, whom adherents consider as God, is outside the religion.

Rastafari religious ceremonies consist of chanting, drumming and meditating in order to reach a state of heightened spirituality.

Rastafarian religious practice includes the ritual inhalation of marijuana, to increase their spiritual awareness.

Rastafarians follow strict dietary laws and abstain from alcohol.

Rastafarians follow a number of Old Testament Laws.

There is a separate code of religious practice for women in Rastafari.

Rastafarians believe reincarnation follows death and that life is eternal.

Rastafarians are forbidden to cut their hair; instead, they grow it and twist it into dreadlocks.

Rastafarians eat clean and natural produce, such as fruit and vegetables.

Rastafarians try to refrain from the consumption of meat, especially pork.

Rastafarians are opposed to abortion and contraception.

The Rastafarian colours are red, green and gold. Sometimes black is added. These colours are chosen because:

-Red signifies the blood of those killed for the cause of the black community, throughout Jamaican history.
-Green represents Jamaica’s vegetation and hope for the eradication of suppression.
-Gold symbolises the wealth of Ethiopia.
-Black signifies the colour of the Africans who initiated Rastafari.

The Rastafarian symbol
The lion is the symbol of Rastafari.

This lion represents Haile Selassie I, who is referred to as the ‘Conquering Lion of Judah’. Rastafarians’ dreadlocks represent the lion’s mane.”

Source: https://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/rastafari/ataglance/glance.shtml