Tag Archives: brain

Poetry #125: Purgatorial Sinkhole

Within the core of these bones I can feel the tingling

From sour nights and long days

Night and day

Numbed with pills

Until the night spills

Numbed and stilled

Cold and chilled

This is how withdrawals feel

Day neurotransmitters

Night flat reality spoiling litters

Afraid of evenings stale and bleak

Shutting down, toxic leak

Burning eyes

Silent cries

Lonely realms

Complex situations

Logical insuntinations

Tired of reigniting the pain in my being

My heart cracks and I call out to my maker

If you leave me hanging

I might as well lay down and die

The world appears plastic

My ligaments spastic

This overwhelming dam is drastic

You think it will never happen to you, something so dramatic

Masking the wounds voicing sarcastic

The outside faces, enthusiastic

You see this sweet girl

With shards of glass under her skin

Maybe the strongest drug for a human being is another human being

If only the Great Spirit would let me in

Purgatory

Sinkhole

Please weave the web back into the whole

Quivering and shaking

So much giving and not much taking

Tell me what is the moon without the sun?

Where did the days go of having fun?

I search for the fragments of you in every dry well

And wonder if I will survive this draught

‘Cause one day I want to smile

As the woman walking the miles

‘Cause then I’ll be free

‘Cause then I’ll be free

To be the authentic real me.

~DiosRaw 04/03/21 21:20PM

Philosophy #21: Physicalism

Physicalism is a philosophical position holding that everything which exists is no more extensive than its physical properties; that is, that there are no kinds of things other than physical things. According to physicalism, the language of physics is the universal language of science and, consequently, any knowledge can be brought back to statements on the physical objects. In contemporary philosophy, physicalism is most frequently associated with the mind-body problem where it holds that all that has been ascribed to “mind” is more correctly ascribed to “brain” or the activity of the brain.

Poetry #92: Writing Stifle

Squirming and wailing

Frial and defaming

Blaming and gaming

Drama is containing

All I want to do is write

Stifled by that fear and fright

Unknown things that make me fight

Who truly knows what goes on in your life?

Demons at the right

All I want to do is write

Drained

Each toke of this cigarette

Is making me sick

But what can I do when I got no help and I used this as a coping mechanism to stick

Me to this earth

When pain is all I felt

These tokes light up the dopamine

That was ripped from my brain

It seems no neurotransmitters emit in my brain

Turning me insane

The ego berating I am lame

I just want to leave this game

Behind four walls

Claustrophobic and numb

Every inch aches up until the edge of the thumb

All I want to do is write

Those shadowy figures in the night

All I want to do is write.

~DiosRaw 03/02/21 13:04PM

Instruments #4: Singing Bowls

“Bronze bowls have undoubtedly been produced in Himalayan region for centuries. They were widely used as begging bowls, chalices or kitchen bowls, although there appears to be no written historical evidence that they were widely used for the production of sound. Furthermore, there is no evidence that singing bowls formed part of traditional religious practices, as bells other musical instruments are known to have done. However, bronze ‘kitchen bowls’ have always been highly valued possessions in the homes of Northern India, Nepal and Tibet, and they were passed down from one generation to the next.

Western interest in the sound produced by these old bronze bowls seems to have taken hold in the Sixties, as these areas became part of the ‘Hippie Trail’. Singing bowls are now produced throughout the Himalayas and India to satisfy demand in the West.

Special Resonances
Although the way the Himalayan people used these bowls is open to question, one thing is certain – Westerners are often affected in a particular way when they hear the unique sound of a singing bowl for the first time. The resonances cannot be reproduced by any instrument in Western culture, nor can a recording of the sound produce the same effect. Many people feel their spirit has been touched when they hear the sound.

Increasingly, sound therapy is being used in healing. Powerful vibrations emanate from a singing bowl when it is played, and these can spread quickly through the cells of the body. Physiotherapists also make use of the phenomena of internal massage with ultra-sonic sound waves. It is claimed that the harmonic frequencies of singing bowls can be used to stimulate the natural harmonic frequencies of different parts of the body.

Mystics throughout the ages have used music and chanting to achieve altered states of consciousness. The normal state of the brain produces Beta waves, whilst Alpha waves are present when the brain is in a state of meditation and calm. The sound wave pattern produced by some singing bowls is equivalent to the alpha waves produced in the brain. These bowls can induce a sense of deep relaxation and access to the inner self.

Furthermore, healers and mystics often the powerful vibrations of the singing bowl to clear negative energies within a room.”

Source: https://www.windhorse.co.uk/tibetan-singing-bowls.html

Subconscious Mind

Aristotle didn’t actually say “You are what you repeatedly do,” but irregardless of the fact that this famous quote has been misattributed, it is still a wonderful piece of wisdom! If you want to make longlasting changes in your life, it requires repetition.

Here’s why: the subconscious mind actually manifests 95% of your reality. This part of your mind is formed pretty much completely between the ages of 0 and 7, when our brains are predominately in a Theta wave state. The thoughts and beliefs of our parents, caregivers, and even the media end up forming the template of our subconscious mind.

If we don’t do the healing work, this subconscious mind will continue to manifest the same sorts of problems and frustrations for us over and over again. Only 5% of our thoughts come from the input of the conscious mind, so that’s why making lasting change in your life requires a lot of deliberate repetition.

Scientists Explain How The Growth of A Baby’s Brain “Literally Requires Positive Interaction”

  • “The Facts:

    Neglect is abuse and can cause an underdeveloped brain in your child. Love, connection, attachment will do the opposite, and help your child’s brain grow in a healthy way.

  • Reflect On:

    Babies do not have the capacity to meet their own needs; they rely on their caregivers. Attempting to allow them to “self-soothe” will do more harm than you may be aware of.

Loving your child will physically translate into a larger, healthier brain than children who suffer from extreme neglect, abuse and trauma. It’s true that children need to be loved and supported and not just so they can feel good about themselves, but so they can physically develop the way they are supposed to.

This is important information for parents to know, especially as there has been a debate over whether or not children, especially babies, should be attached with their mothers or if they should be left to ‘cry it out’ on their own, or ‘self-soothe.’ This goes beyond the child being independent and emotionally strong; it will impact how the child will develop physically into a healthy adult, and whether they will encounter mental health problems and addictive behavior as they grow up.

Brain Scans

The following image is a depiction of the brains of two children; the one on the left had an attentive caregiver who consistently loved, cared for, responded to and interacted positively with him. The brain of the child on the right was neglected, ignored and abused.

“The child on the right will grow into an adult who is less intelligent, less able to empathize with others, more likely to become addicted to drugs and involved in violent crime … and to develop mental and other serious health problems,” says an article published in The Telegraph in 2012.

According to UCLA Psychiatry Professor Allan Schore. a leading neurologist in the study of how the development of a child is affected by the amount of love given by its caregiver, “the growth of the baby’s brain literally requires positive interaction between mother and infant, the development of cerebral circuits depend on it.”

Hopefully soon this information will be such common knowledge and our children will be raised with the utmost care, love, and affection. But until then, it’s important to spread the word! If you found this information useful or know anyone who would, please share.

Source: https://www.collective-evolution.com/2021/01/09/scientists-explain-how-the-growth-of-a-babys-brain-literally-requires-positive-interaction/

Brainwaves – Part 3

“WHAT BRAINWAVES MEAN TO YOU
Our brainwave profile and our daily experience of the world are inseparable. When our brainwaves are out of balance, there will be corresponding problems in our emotional or neuro-physical health. Research has identified brainwave patterns associated with all sorts of emotional and neurological conditions. more…

Over-arousal in certain brain areas is linked with anxiety disorders, sleep problems, nightmares, hyper-vigilance, impulsive behaviour, anger/aggression, agitated depression, chronic nerve pain and spasticity. Under-arousal in certain brain areas leads to some types of depression, attention deficit, chronic pain and insomnia. A combination of under-arousal and over-arousal is seen in cases of anxiety, depression and ADHD. more…

Instabilities in brain rhythms correlate with tics, obsessive-compulsive disorder, aggressive behaviour, rage, bruxism, panic attacks, bipolar disorder, migraines, narcolepsy, epilepsy, sleep apnea, vertigo, tinnitus, anorexia/bulimia, PMT, diabetes, hypoglycaemia and explosive behaviour. more…

ALTERING YOUR BRAINWAVES
By rule of thumb, any process that changes your perception changes your brainwaves.

Chemical interventions such as medications or recreational drugs are the most common methods to alter brain function; however brainwave training is our method of choice.

Over the long term, traditional eastern methods (such as meditation and yoga) train your brainwaves into balance. Of the newer methods, brainwave entrainment is an easy, low-cost method to temporarily alter your brainwave state. If you are trying to solve a particular difficulty or fine-tune your brainwave function, state-of-the-art brain training methods like neurofeedback and pEMF deliver targeted, quick, and lasting results.”

Brain Waves – Part 2

“INFRA-LOW (<.5HZ)
Infra-Low brainwaves (also known as Slow Cortical Potentials), are thought to be the basic cortical rythms that underlie our higher brain functions. Very little is known about infra-low brainwaves. Their slow nature make them difficult to detect and accurately measure, so few studies have been done. They appear to take a major role in brain timing and network function.

DELTA WAVES (.5 TO 3 HZ)
Delta Waves, the slowest but loudest brainwaves

Delta brainwaves are slow, loud brainwaves (low frequency and deeply penetrating, like a drum beat). They are generated in deepest meditation and dreamless sleep. Delta waves suspend external awareness and are the source of empathy. Healing and regeneration are stimulated in this state, and that is why deep restorative sleep is so essential to the healing process.

THETA WAVES (3 TO 8 HZ)
Theta brainwaves, occur in sleep and are also dominant in deep meditation.

Theta brainwaves occur most often in sleep but are also dominant in deep meditation. Theta is our gateway to learning, memory, and intuition. In theta, our senses are withdrawn from the external world and focused on signals originating from within. It is that twilight state which we normally only experience fleetingly as we wake or drift off to sleep. In theta we are in a dream; vivid imagery, intuition and information beyond our normal conscious awareness. It’s where we hold our ‘stuff’, our fears, troubled history, and nightmares.

ALPHA WAVES (8 TO 12 HZ)
Alpha brainwaves occur during quietly flowing thoughts, but not quite meditation.

Alpha brainwaves are dominant during quietly flowing thoughts, and in some meditative states. Alpha is ‘the power of now’, being here, in the present. Alpha is the resting state for the brain. Alpha waves aid overall mental coordination, calmness, alertness, mind/body integration and learning.

BETA WAVES (12 TO 38 HZ)
Beta brainwaves are present in our normal waking state of consciousness.

Beta brainwaves dominate our normal waking state of consciousness when attention is directed towards cognitive tasks and the outside world. Beta is a ‘fast’ activity, present when we are alert, attentive, engaged in problem solving, judgment, decision making, or focused mental activity.

Beta brainwaves are further divided into three bands; Lo-Beta (Beta1, 12-15Hz) can be thought of as a ‘fast idle’, or musing. Beta (Beta2, 15-22Hz) is high engagement or actively figuring something out. Hi-Beta (Beta3, 22-38Hz) is highly complex thought, integrating new experiences, high anxiety, or excitement. Continual high frequency processing is not a very efficient way to run the brain, as it takes a tremendous amount of energy.

GAMMA WAVES (38 TO 42 HZ)
Gamma brainwaves are the fastest of brain waves and relate to simultaneous processing of information from different brain areas

Gamma brainwaves are the fastest of brain waves (high frequency, like a flute), and relate to simultaneous processing of information from different brain areas. Gamma brainwaves pass information rapidly and quietly. The most subtle of the brainwave frequencies, the mind has to be quiet to access gamma.

Gamma was dismissed as ‘spare brain noise’ until researchers discovered it was highly active when in states of universal love, altruism, and the ‘higher virtues’. Gamma is also above the frequency of neuronal firing, so how it is generated remains a mystery. It is speculated that gamma rhythms modulate perception and consciousness, and that a greater presence of gamma relates to expanded consciousness and spiritual emergence.”

Brainwaves – Part 1

“At the root of all our thoughts, emotions and behaviours is the communication between neurons within our brains. Brainwaves are produced by synchronised electrical pulses from masses of neurons communicating with each other.

Brainwaves are detected using sensors placed on the scalp. They are divided into bandwidths to describe their functions (below), but are best thought of as a continuous spectrum of consciousness; from slow, loud and functional – to fast, subtle, and complex.

It is a handy analogy to think of brainwaves as musical notes – the low frequency waves are like a deeply penetrating drum beat, while the higher frequency brainwaves are more like a subtle high pitched flute. Like a symphony, the higher and lower frequencies link and cohere with each other through harmonics.

Our brainwaves change according to what we’re doing and feeling. When slower brainwaves are dominant we can feel tired, slow, sluggish, or dreamy. The higher frequencies are dominant when we feel wired, or hyper-alert.

The descriptions that follow are only broad descriptions – in practice things are far more complex, and brainwaves reflect different aspects when they occur in different locations in the brain.

Brainwave speed is measured in Hertz (cycles per second) and they are divided into bands delineating slow, moderate, and fast waves.”

Source: https://brainworksneurotherapy.com/what-are-brainwaves#:~:text=At%20the%20root%20of%20all,sensors%20placed%20on%20the%20scalp.

Civilisations #18: The Southwestern Culture

“Overview
The greater Southwest has long been occupied by hunter-gatherers and agricultural settlements. This area, comprised of modern-day Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Nevada, and the states of Sonora and Chihuahua in northern Mexico, has seen successive prehistoric cultural traditions since approximately 12,000 years ago. Three of the major cultural traditions that impacted the region include the Paleo-Indian tradition, the Southwestern Archaic tradition, and the Post-Archaic cultures tradition. As various cultures developed over time, many of them shared similarities in family structure and religious beliefs.

Southwestern Agriculture
Southwestern farmers probably began experimenting with agriculture by facilitating the growth of wild grains such as amaranth and chenopods as well as gourds for their edible seeds and shells. The earliest maize known to have been grown in the Southwest was a popcorn varietal measuring one to two inches long. It was not a very productive crop. More productive varieties were developed later by Southwestern farmers or introduced via Mesoamerica, though the drought-resistant tepary bean was native to the region. Cotton has been found at archaeological sites dating to about 1,200 BCE in the Tucson basin and was most likely cultivated by indigenous peoples in the region. Evidence of tobacco use and possibly the cultivation of tobacco, dates back to approximately the same time period.

Agave, especially agave murpheyi, was a major food source of the Hohokam and grown on dry hillsides where other crops would not grow. Early farmers also possibly cultivated cactus fruit, mesquite bean, and species of wild grasses for their edible seeds.

Paleolithic peoples utilized habitats near water sources like rivers, swamps, and marshes, which had an abundance of fish and attracted birds and game animals. They hunted big game—bison, mammoths, and ground sloths—who were also attracted to these water sources. A period of relatively wet conditions saw many cultures in the American Southwest flourish. Extensive irrigation systems were developed and were among the largest of the ancient world. Elaborate adobe and sandstone buildings were constructed, and highly ornamental and artistic pottery was created. The unusual weather conditions could not continue forever, however, and gave way in time, to the more common arid conditions of the area. These dry conditions necessitated a more minimal way of life and, eventually, the elaborate accomplishments of these cultures were abandoned.

During this time, the people of the Southwest developed a variety of subsistence strategies, all using their own specific techniques. The nutritive value of weed and grass seeds was discovered and flat rocks were used to grind flour to produce gruels and breads. The use of grinding slabs originated around 7,500 BCE and marks the beginning of the Archaic tradition. Small bands of people traveled throughout the area gathering plants such as cactus fruits, mesquite beans, acorns, and pine nuts. Archaic people established camps at collection points, and returned to these places year after year.

The American Indian Archaic culture eventually evolved into two major prehistoric archaeological culture areas in the American Southwest and northern Mexico. These cultures, sometimes referred to as Oasisamerica, are characterized by dependence on agriculture, formal social stratification, population clusters, and major architecture. One of the major cultures that developed during this time was the Pueblo peoples, formerly referred to as the Anasazi. Their distinctive pottery and dwelling construction styles emerged in the area around 750 CE. Ancestral Pueblo peoples are renowned for the construction of and cultural achievement present at Pueblo Bonito and other sites in Chaco Canyon, as well as Mesa Verde, Aztec Ruins, and Salmon Ruins. Other cultural traditions that developed during this time include the Hohokam and Mogollon traditions.

Family And Religion
Paleolithic peoples in the Southwest initially structured their families and communities into highly mobile traveling groups of approximately 20 to 50 members, moving place to place as resources were depleted and additional supplies were needed. As cultural traditions began to evolve throughout the Southwest between 7,500 BCE to 1,550 CE, many cultures developed similar social and religious traditions. For the Pueblos and other Southwest American Indian communities, the transition from a hunting-gathering, nomadic experience to more permanent agricultural settlements meant more firmly established families and communities. Climate change that occurred about 3,500 years ago during the Archaic period, however, changed patterns in water sources, dramatically decreasing the population of indigenous peoples. Many family-based groups took shelter in caves and rock overhangs within canyon walls, many of which faced south to capitalize on warmth from the sun during the winter. Occasionally, these peoples lived in small, semi-sedentary hamlets in open areas.

Many Southwest tribes during the Post-Archaic period lived in a range of structures that included small family pit houses, larger structures to house clans, grand pueblos, and cliff-sited dwellings for defense. These communities developed complex networks that stretched across the Colorado Plateau, linking hundreds of neighborhoods and population centers.

While southwestern tribes developed more permanent family structures and established complex communities, they also developed and shared a similar understanding of the spiritual and natural world. Many of the tribes that made up the Southwest Culture practiced animism and shamanism. Shamanism encompasses the premise that shamans are intermediaries or messengers between the human world and the spirit worlds. At the same time, animism encompasses the beliefs that there is no separation between the spiritual and physical (or material) world, and that souls or spirits exist not only in humans, but also in some other animals, plants, rocks, and geographic features such as mountains or rivers, or other entities of the natural environment, including thunder, wind, and shadows.

Conclusion
Although at present there are a variety of contemporary cultural traditions that exist in the greater Southwest, many of these traditions still incorporate similar religious aspects that are found in animism and shamanism. Some of these cultural traditions include the Yuman-speaking peoples inhabiting the Colorado River valley, the uplands, and Baja California; O’odham peoples of southern Arizona and northern Sonora; and the Pueblo peoples of Arizona and New Mexico.”

Source: https://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-hccc-worldcivilization/chapter/southwestern-culture/

Mental Health #1: Psychosis

Psychosis

Most people think of psychosis as a break with reality. In a way it is. Psychosis is characterized as disruptions to a person’s thoughts and perceptions that make it difficult for them to recognize what is real and what isn’t. These disruptions are often experienced as seeing, hearing and believing things that aren’t real or having strange, persistent thoughts, behaviors and emotions. While everyone’s experience is different, most people say psychosis is frightening and confusing.

Psychosis is a symptom, not an illness, and it is more common than you may think. In the U.S., approximately 100,000 young people experience psychosis each year. As many as 3 in 100 people will have an episode at some point in their lives.

Early or first-episode psychosis (FEP) refers to when a person first shows signs of beginning to lose contact with reality. Acting quickly to connect a person with the right treatment during early psychosis or FEP can be life-changing and radically alter that person’s future.

Symptoms
Early Warning Signs Before Psychosis
Early psychosis or FEP rarely comes suddenly. Usually, a person has gradual, non-specific changes in thoughts and perceptions, but doesn’t understand what’s going on. Early warning signs can be difficult to distinguish from typical teen or young adult behavior. While such signs should not be cause for alarm, they may indicate the need to get an assessment from a doctor.

Encouraging people to seek help for early psychosis is important. Families are often the first to see early signs of psychosis and the first to address the issue of seeking treatment. However, a person’s willingness to accept help is often complicated by delusions, fears, stigma and feeling unsettled. In this case, families can find the situation extremely difficult, but there are engagement strategies to help encourage a person to seek help.

It’s important to get help quickly since early treatment provides the best hope of recovery by slowing, stopping and possibly reversing the effects of psychosis. Early warning signs include the following:

-A worrisome drop in grades or job performance
-Trouble thinking clearly or concentrating
-Suspiciousness or uneasiness with others
-A decline in self-care or personal hygiene
-Spending a lot more time alone than usual
-Strong, inappropriate emotions or having no feelings at all

Signs Of Early Or First-Episode Psychosis
Determining exactly when the first episode of psychosis begins can be hard, but these signs and symptoms strongly indicate an episode of psychosis:

-Hearing, seeing, tasting or believing things that others don’t
-Persistent, unusual thoughts or beliefs that can’t be set aside regardless of what others believe
-Strong and inappropriate emotions or no emotions at all
-Withdrawing from family or friends
-A sudden decline in self-care
-Trouble thinking clearly or concentrating

Such warning signs often point to a person’s deteriorating health, and a physical and neurological evaluation can help find the problem. A mental health professional performing a psychological evaluation can determine if a mental health condition is involved and discuss next steps. If the psychosis is a symptom of a mental health condition, early action helps to keep lives on track.

Psychosis
Psychosis includes a range of symptoms but typically involves one of these two major experiences:

-Hallucinations are seeing, hearing or feeling things that aren’t there, such as the following:

-Hearing voices (auditory hallucinations)
-Strange sensations or unexplainable feelings
-Seeing glimpses of objects or people that are not there or distortions
-Delusions are strong beliefs that are not consistent with the person’s culture, are unlikely to be true and may seem irrational to others, such as the following:

-Believing external forces are controlling thoughts, feelings and behaviors
-Believing that trivial remarks, events or objects have personal meaning or significance
-Thinking you have special powers, are on a special mission or even that you are God.

Causes
We are still learning about how and why psychosis develops, but several factors are likely involved. We do know that teenagers and young adults are at increased risk of experiencing an episode of psychosis because of hormonal changes in their brain during puberty.

Several factors that can contribute to psychosis:

-Genetics. Many genes can contribute to the development of psychosis, but just because a person has a gene doesn’t mean they will experience psychosis. -Ongoing studies will help us better understand which genes play a role in psychosis.
-Trauma. A traumatic event such as a death, war or sexual assault can trigger a psychotic episode. The type of trauma—and a person’s age—affects whether a traumatic event will result in psychosis.
-Substance use. The use of marijuana, LSD, amphetamines and other substances can increase the risk of psychosis in people who are already vulnerable.
-Physical illness or injury. Traumatic brain injuries, brain tumors, strokes, HIV and some brain diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and dementia can sometimes cause psychosis.
-Mental health conditions. Sometimes psychosis is a symptom of a condition like schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder or depression.

Diagnosis
A diagnosis identifies an illness; symptoms are components of an illness. Health care providers draw on information from medical and family history and a physical examination to diagnose someone. If causes such as a brain tumor, infection or epilepsy are ruled out, a mental illness might be the reason.

If the cause is related to a mental health condition, early diagnosis and treatment provide the best hope of recovery. Research shows that the earlier people experiencing psychosis receive treatment, the better their long-term quality of life.

Treatment
Early Or First-Episode Psychosis
Early treatment of psychosis, especially during the first episode, leads to the best outcomes.

Research has shown significant success using a treatment approach called Coordinated Specialty Care (CSC). CSC uses a team of health professionals and specialists who work with a person to create a personal treatment plan based on life goals while involving family members as much as possible.

CSC has the following key components:

-Case management
-Family support and education
-Psychotherapy
-Medication management
-Supported education and employment
-Peer support
-Psychosis Treatment
-Traditional treatment for psychosis involves psychotherapy and medication. Several types of therapy have successfully helped individuals learn to manage their condition. In addition, medication targets symptoms and helps reduce their impact.”

Source: https://www.nami.org/About-Mental-Illness/Mental-Health-Conditions/Psychosis

What Are Brainwaves?

“At the root of all our thoughts, emotions and behaviours is the communication between neurons within our brains. Brainwaves are produced by synchronised electrical pulses from masses of neurons communicating with each other.

Brainwaves are detected using sensors placed on the scalp. They are divided into bandwidths to describe their functions (below), but are best thought of as a continuous spectrum of consciousness; from slow, loud and functional – to fast, subtle, and complex.

It is a handy analogy to think of brainwaves as musical notes – the low frequency waves are like a deeply penetrating drum beat, while the higher frequency brainwaves are more like a subtle high pitched flute. Like a symphony, the higher and lower frequencies link and cohere with each other through harmonics.

Our brainwaves change according to what we’re doing and feeling. When slower brainwaves are dominant we can feel tired, slow, sluggish, or dreamy. The higher frequencies are dominant when we feel wired, or hyper-alert.

The descriptions that follow are only broad descriptions – in practice things are far more complex, and brainwaves reflect different aspects when they occur in different locations in the brain.

Brainwave speed is measured in Hertz (cycles per second) and they are divided into bands delineating slow, moderate, and fast waves.

INFRA-LOW (<.5HZ)
Infra-Low brainwaves (also known as Slow Cortical Potentials), are thought to be the basic cortical rythms that underlie our higher brain functions. Very little is known about infra-low brainwaves. Their slow nature make them difficult to detect and accurately measure, so few studies have been done. They appear to take a major role in brain timing and network function.

DELTA WAVES (.5 TO 3 HZ)
Delta Waves, the slowest but loudest brainwaves

Delta brainwaves are slow, loud brainwaves (low frequency and deeply penetrating, like a drum beat). They are generated in deepest meditation and dreamless sleep. Delta waves suspend external awareness and are the source of empathy. Healing and regeneration are stimulated in this state, and that is why deep restorative sleep is so essential to the healing process.

THETA WAVES (3 TO 8 HZ)
Theta brainwaves, occur in sleep and are also dominant in deep meditation.

Theta brainwaves occur most often in sleep but are also dominant in deep meditation. Theta is our gateway to learning, memory, and intuition. In theta, our senses are withdrawn from the external world and focused on signals originating from within. It is that twilight state which we normally only experience fleetingly as we wake or drift off to sleep. In theta we are in a dream; vivid imagery, intuition and information beyond our normal conscious awareness. It’s where we hold our ‘stuff’, our fears, troubled history, and nightmares.

ALPHA WAVES (8 TO 12 HZ)
Alpha brainwaves occur during quietly flowing thoughts, but not quite meditation.

Alpha brainwaves are dominant during quietly flowing thoughts, and in some meditative states. Alpha is ‘the power of now’, being here, in the present. Alpha is the resting state for the brain. Alpha waves aid overall mental coordination, calmness, alertness, mind/body integration and learning.

BETA WAVES (12 TO 38 HZ)
Beta brainwaves are present in our normal waking state of consciousness.

Beta brainwaves dominate our normal waking state of consciousness when attention is directed towards cognitive tasks and the outside world. Beta is a ‘fast’ activity, present when we are alert, attentive, engaged in problem solving, judgment, decision making, or focused mental activity.

Beta brainwaves are further divided into three bands; Lo-Beta (Beta1, 12-15Hz) can be thought of as a ‘fast idle’, or musing. Beta (Beta2, 15-22Hz) is high engagement or actively figuring something out. Hi-Beta (Beta3, 22-38Hz) is highly complex thought, integrating new experiences, high anxiety, or excitement. Continual high frequency processing is not a very efficient way to run the brain, as it takes a tremendous amount of energy.

GAMMA WAVES (38 TO 42 HZ)
Gamma brainwaves are the fastest of brain waves and relate to simultaneous processing of information from different brain areas

Gamma brainwaves are the fastest of brain waves (high frequency, like a flute), and relate to simultaneous processing of information from different brain areas. Gamma brainwaves pass information rapidly and quietly. The most subtle of the brainwave frequencies, the mind has to be quiet to access gamma.

Gamma was dismissed as ‘spare brain noise’ until researchers discovered it was highly active when in states of universal love, altruism, and the ‘higher virtues’. Gamma is also above the frequency of neuronal firing, so how it is generated remains a mystery. It is speculated that gamma rhythms modulate perception and consciousness, and that a greater presence of gamma relates to expanded consciousness and spiritual emergence.

WHAT BRAINWAVES MEAN TO YOU
Our brainwave profile and our daily experience of the world are inseparable. When our brainwaves are out of balance, there will be corresponding problems in our emotional or neuro-physical health. Research has identified brainwave patterns associated with all sorts of emotional and neurological conditions. more…

Over-arousal in certain brain areas is linked with anxiety disorders, sleep problems, nightmares, hyper-vigilance, impulsive behaviour, anger/aggression, agitated depression, chronic nerve pain and spasticity. Under-arousal in certain brain areas leads to some types of depression, attention deficit, chronic pain and insomnia. A combination of under-arousal and over-arousal is seen in cases of anxiety, depression and ADHD. more…

Instabilities in brain rhythms correlate with tics, obsessive-compulsive disorder, aggressive behaviour, rage, bruxism, panic attacks, bipolar disorder, migraines, narcolepsy, epilepsy, sleep apnea, vertigo, tinnitus, anorexia/bulimia, PMT, diabetes, hypoglycaemia and explosive behaviour. more…

ALTERING YOUR BRAINWAVES
By rule of thumb, any process that changes your perception changes your brainwaves.

Chemical interventions such as medications or recreational drugs are the most common methods to alter brain function; however brainwave training is our method of choice.

Over the long term, traditional eastern methods (such as meditation and yoga) train your brainwaves into balance. Of the newer methods, brainwave entrainment is an easy, low-cost method to temporarily alter your brainwave state. If you are trying to solve a particular difficulty or fine-tune your brainwave function, state-of-the-art brain training methods like neurofeedback and pEMF deliver targeted, quick, and lasting results.”

Source: https://brainworksneurotherapy.com/what-are-brainwaves